Chord Definition

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Understanding How To Manipulate A Chord Definition

Many people only know a chord by one name and the ability to change a chord definition so it can be used in many creative ways is vital knowledge when considering drop two voicings. In this lesson, Ged Brockie goes over the ideas presented in his book for GMI “Drop Two Voicings Uncovered” and shows how we can use synonyms to create a force multiplier for our chords. Make sure to watch the full video on this lesson as well as downloading the free resources which are available right below this text.

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chord definition
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Lesson Five – Using Synonyms To Change A Chord Definition

This is a partial transcription of the text found within the video above. This lesson is about synonyms, or at least, partly about that. We are going to be looking at how we can use chordal synonyms to expand upon the chord choices we have for a given measure. So we can create more movement in the chord progressions that this course has been looking at, so far anyway. This is the drop two voicings course which accompanies the book “Drop Two Voicings Uncovered”. Now, if you’re just watching this and you don’t have the book that’s okay because there is free material for you to enjoy in each of the lessons over all thirteen videos. If you do have the book, then obviously you are going to get a whole lot more out of it and I would encourage you to go through each and every one of the video lessons along with the “Drop Two Voicings Uncovered” book.

So, what is a synonym? Well, fundamentally it’s a way of expressing a range of notes in different ways and as such alters the chord definition that a chord has. In this actual lesson we are looking at the progression of a II – V – I and we are extending the use of the I chord at the end of the progression. In the previous lesson we had a II – V – I which ended in a major seventh. We are going to add a major sixth. Now that doesn’t mean that you have got to go away and learn a whole new range of major sixth chords.

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