b7 chord

0
1180

Turning The b7 Chord Into A Dominant Ninth

Looking to spice up your dominant chords? The dominant ninth is a must go to chord, but in this lesson you’ll learn how to play the chord four ways, not just one right up the guitar fretboard. To get the most from this lesson, watch the video (which can be expanded to full screen) and download the free materials below.

COME FROM YOUTUBE? DOWNLOAD THE RESOURCES FOR THIS VIDEO FROM THE GMI GUITAR SHIP? CLICK Lesson 4 Drop Two Voicings Uncovered Free Material!

b7 chord
INTERESTED IN BUYING THE BOOK? CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE

Lesson Four – Changing a b7 To A Dominant Ninth

This is a partial transcription of the text found within the video above. Welcome back, I really do hope that you’ve been enjoying the videos in the series and I really do hope that you gone through all the videos and that you’ve watched and learned from them. If you have done that, then that’s fantastic. If you’re just dipping in and looking at things I’d encourage you to go back and look at the other videos. There are plenty of great ideas within them and everything in this course of videos builds from something else. So, you really will learn a lot and this lesson will mean a whole lot more if you’ve looked at those previous lessons. So whether you have or you haven’t, this video is all about dominant ninths and how to create them from a b7 chord.

So, everyone likes playing ninth chords. You may know a ninth chord, you may know this one here. Everyone knows this, it’s used in blues, it’s used in jazz, it’s used in pop music and sometimes even rock music. Certainly used in funk as well, parts of it. I just want to talk about these chords in relation to this course; this thirteen video course which is all about drop two voicings. I’m not going to go into what drop two voicings are, if your scratching your head about that then please go back and look at earlier videos. Specifically lesson one which goes into depth as to what a drop two voicing are and why we use them.

What is a dominant ninth and why do we even want them. I mean, what is wrong with a plain old dominant seventh chord? Now we have been playing in the previous lessons, we’ve been looking how to play that chord in progression. For more on the b7 chord please watch the video shown above for the full narration.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here